23 Sep 2009

Bragging about the Negatives

Submitted by Stephen Winters
TitleBragging about the Negatives
Publication TypeWeb Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsMaher, B
Access Year2009
Access DateSep 9, 2009
Last Update Date2009
Publisherbarrymaher.com
KeywordsOvercoming a Negative Past, Using Our Dark Side for Good
Abstract

Clyde Thompson walked into the interview room with about as much chance of getting that job as he had of being elected Miss Congeniality in Atlantic City the following September. Then he provided us with all the reasons why we might not want to hire him: all the ones that we probably would have brought up on our own once he was out of the room, and a few more we might never have come up with. 


When he did leave, however, the discussion barely touched on any of those negative points. Since Clyde had put them all on the table, it was as if we'd already dealt with them. Not that I talked much, mostly I just sat and listened—with a growing amusement. Clyde had turned his unemployability into his greatest strength. And the fact that the other leading candidates were so good that they could quit and get hired anywhere else had actually become a liability for them. Everybody in the room was convinced that Clyde would never add to that 37 percent turnover rate. Not if there was anything he could possibly do to prevent it.  


That's the Filling the Glass strategy I call Bragging about the Negatives. If you can brag about a negative you've made peace with it. Often the secret to making peace with a negative is to find a way you can honestly brag about it and honestly sell it to yourself.

Notes

This articles tells how to turn a strong negative into a strong positive.

URLhttp://www.barrymaher.com/Selling_Negatives.htm
Citation KeyctkeyBragNegMayer

Add new comment

Mobile

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.