28 Jan 2015

Confirmation Bias : A Ubiquitous Phenomenon in Many Guises

Submitted by Stephen Winters
TitleConfirmation Bias : A Ubiquitous Phenomenon in Many Guises
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1998
AuthorsNickerson, RS
JournalReview of General Psychology
Volume2
Start Page175
Date Published1998
Keywordsconfirmation bias
Abstract

Confirmation bias, as the term is typically used in the psychological literature, connotes the seeking or interpreting of evidence in ways that are partial to existing beliefs, expectations, or a hypothesis in hand. the author revies evidence of such a bias in a variety of guises and gives examples of its operation in several practical contexts. Possible explanations are considered, and the question ofits utility or disutility is discussed.

"If one were to attempt to identify a single problematic aspect of human reasoning that deserves attention above all others, the confirmation bias we be among the candidates for consideration. Many have written about this bias, and it appears to be sufficiently strong and pervasive that one is led to wonder whether the bias, by itself, might account for a significant faction of the disputes, altercations, and misunderstandings that occur among individcuals, groups, and nations."

URLhttp://psy2.ucsd.edu/~mckenzie/nickersonConfirmationBias.pdf
Citation Keyctkey693
AttachmentSize
PDF icon nickersonConfirmationBias.pdf4.1 MB

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